Yellow Jack. No going back.

I woke up this morning to a raft of WhatsApp messages and emails of condolence, sympathy and ‘thinking of you’. I knew then that Clipper had (finally) made a decision. I am not in agreement with their decision – for what it’s worth, I wish they’d just called this edition of the race a day – but there we go. It’s done. My journey over the last 2 years and 9 months has been postponed; 4 weeks and two days before I was to depart from home. I am mostly feeling numb with occasional bursts of anger and tears. It’s a process. I shall learn to re-orientate my compass in time. I shall not write about how I am feeling right now for the risk of writing anything I’ll regret in time, but suffice to say there is a lot more at stake in all this than simply sailing in the race itself.

 

This is the official statement I received from Clipper today, which I know many of you have been expecting over the last week.

All current Leg 6 race crew are currently quarantined on the yachts in Subic Bay marina. Subic Bay is located on the Filipino island of Luzon, which is currently under ‘enhanced community quarantine’. Reports from current crew is that they are getting by with access to a toilet and cold showers and lots of games of backgammon and silliness to keep up morale.

Although the mosquitoes, humidity and general anxiety on board about whether they will get themselves and their luggage back home before lock-down are real challenges for them right now, in my eyes, everyone who has crewed in this race so far is a winner. It has been an unprecedented edition of the race because of all the geopolitical and environmental challenges the crews have encountered along the way. None of us ever thought for a moment that a pandemic would hinder us in achieving the race of our lives. Rather, we were all talking about unemployment, ill-health, bereavement, pregnancy as being the possible events that would curtail our plans to achieve what we set out to do.

Historically, the Clipper fleet would have to fly a “Yellow Jack” – a yellow signal flag (Q for Quebec) to indicate that they were under quarantine. However, in modern maritime use a yellow flag now indicates the opposite; as a signal of a ship free of disease that requests boarding and inspection by Port State Control. Today, the fleet would need to fly the Lima (L) signal flag in harbour which is made up of black and yellow squares to indicate that the “ship is under quarantine”. According to that free resource of dubious provenance my students all rely on, Wikipedia: 

“In International maritime signal flags, plain yellow, green, and even black flags have been used to symbolize disease in both ships and ports, with the colour yellow having a longer historical precedent, as a colour of marking for houses of infection, previous to its use as a maritime marking colour for disease. It is sometimes called the “yellow jack”, which became a name for yellow fever. Cholera ships also used a yellow flag. Plain yellow flags are still commonly used to mark a recent death in a neighbourhood in cities such as Jakarta, regardless of the cause. They are placed in intersections leading to the home of the recently deceased as direction markers for mourners, and to mark the funeral convoy so that it is given the right of way.”

As a Death Studies scholar I find all this very interesting, but I was doing the Clipper race as an opportunity to leave my scholarship behind for a change and to get out there and exist in the raw elements rather than behind a computer screen or book. My work colleagues at the Centre for Death and Society (University of Bath) had only a week ago written a heart-felt
announcement in our monthly newsletter, which read:

“This month we want to say a special thank you and bon voyage to CDAS member, colleague and friend Dr. Hannah Rumble, who has worked with us for nearly a decade on projects associated with funeral costs and practice. You probably know her best for the fantastic Dead and Buried project. Hannah is about to set down her academic tools and embark on the adventure of a lifetime, racing in the global Clipper sailing race. We are extremely proud of Hannah and want to thank her for all she has contributed to CDAS over the years. We will miss you Hannah and look forward to hearing about your life on the high seas when you return to the UK later in the year. Safe travels!”

So OK, I am now not departing anywhere at all; each and everyone one of us is feeling the effects of the coronavirus pandemic in our lives somehow. I wish you all the luck in the world for facing and living through the unknown. Now more than ever, hold fast!

Ironically, in the meantime, I have the last of my RYA Day Skipper exams tonight, but given while I was writing this blog post Clipper emailed to say my refresher pre-race sail has now been cancelled, if any of you reading this need an extra deck hand or know someone looking for crew, please pass on my details!

5 thoughts on “Yellow Jack. No going back.

  1. It’s such a weird time Hannah, and I really hope that your sailing adventure will take place at some point in the future. For now it’s long walks, fresh air and stay healthy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow! Bob, I had no idea you were reading this! Once we are all out of self-isolation – who knows when – I think a family reunion would be the order of the day! in the meantime, I hope your family stay healthy in body and mind through these surreal times.

      Like

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